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EphPod creator Joe Masters said the iPod had
great potential as an organizer, particularly because
it's much easier to program than Palm devices. "It's
got so much space, and it's very easy to hack," he said.
"Apple's done a great job. It's very simple. Synchronizing
it is very easy. It's just a hard drive. You just copy files
over. There are no weird synchronization protocols like
the Palm. And you don't have to worry about space, like
on a Palm. It's enormous. Who cares how much space
you use?"
iPod hackers also figured out all kinds of undoc-
umented tips and tricks, including a diagnostic mode
that checks the iPod's internal hard drive, among other
things. VersionTracker, a popular software-download
website, lists more than several dozen hacks for the
iPod. The hacks provide clues to the future direction of
the iPod. "No doubt Apple is taking its cue from some
of these hacks," said Blake Patterson, who runs the
iPodHacks website. "Apple is seeing that a lot of users
want these kinds of organizer functions." Apple didn't
respond to requests for comment.
(THIS PAGE)
Pod Person: Jean-
Olivier Lanctôt-David, a 14-year-
old hacker from Canada, and a
screenshot of his PodNews pro-
gram, which fetches headlines
from the Web in XML format and
displays them on the iPod's small
screen.
CREDIT: LANCTÔT-DAVID
...ALMOST FROM THE MINUTE [THE
iPOD] HIT STORE SHELVES, [HACKERS]
WERE BUSY FIGURING OUT
CLEVER
WAYS OF MAKING THE iPOD
DO MORE
...
(FACING PAGE)
iPod Nut: Joe Mas-
ters (on the left in photo) and
his college buddies enjoy some
doughnuts. Masters wrote Eph-
Pod, which connects iPods to
Windows machines (screenshot
to right).
CREDIT: JOE MASTERS